Trees of New York City

#ad
Countryman Press #ad - This book is a new edition to New York City of Trees. 100 color photographs Countryman. The stories of these trees―some dating back to the Revolutionary era and before―link the living with the past in a visceral and engaging way that will leave readers with a renewed and lasting appreciation of their own environments.

Swett’s warm and welcome voice adds depth and perspective to his collection, as well as an unmistakable charm unique to his city’s cosmopolitan character. Experience the ancient roots and enduring natural beauty of New York as never before. New york city, is still home to a rich collection of diverse tree species, once a lush and verdant group of forested islands, each with a story to tell about the city’s past.

Trees of New York City #ad - This gorgeous book by naturalist and photographer benjamin swett offers stunning color photographs, personal narratives, and fascinating historical observations about a select few of the thousands of trees that thrive in the five boroughs―from the sprawling New York Botanical Garden in spring bloom to the snow-laden residential blocks of Queens in winter.

#ad



Central Park Trees and Landscapes: A Guide to New York City's Masterpiece

#ad
Columbia University Press #ad - Readers can identify each tree on the maps by species using the Tree Maps Key located on the back of the front flap. Anyone who loves trees will find this book a very rewarding read, full of fascinating details and beautiful illustrations. Central park trees and landscapes is divided into two major sections: "the landscapes" opens with a geological account of Manhattan Island―from its position 500 million years ago on the edge of the proto–North American continent to its emergence about 15, 000 years ago from the Laurentide Ice Sheet.

The entries are organized into groups by leaf shapes shown on an easy-to-use identification key located inside the front cover. The tree guide" contains informative essays full of intriguing botanical and historical facts on over 200 of the park's tree species and varieties. The heart of the section is devoted to the construction of the park in the late 1850s and 1860s.

Central Park Trees and Landscapes: A Guide to New York City's Masterpiece #ad - Next, the narrative focuses on the land that would eventually become Central Park―how it was saved from being dissected by John Randel's rigid street grid and how Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux became the park's designers. Under the direction of the central park conservancy, the park's landscapes have been painstakingly restored to achieve the effects envisioned more than 150 years ago by the park's designers, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux.

University Press Group Ltd. Twenty-two of the park's grand landscapes are pictured in dozens of photographs and in seven detailed maps pinpointing nearly 20, 000 trees.

#ad



Field Guide to the Street Trees of New York City

#ad
Johns Hopkins University Press #ad - University Press Group Ltd. Beautiful, flower, fruit, original drawings of leaves and stunning photographs of bark, and twig accompany informative descriptions of each species. Your evening walk will never be the same once you come to know the quiet giants that line the city's streets. That sylvan place is new York City, and this is a guide to the diverse trees that line its streets.

Field guide to the street trees of new york City acquaints New Yorkers and visitors alike with fifty species of trees commonly found in the neighborhoods where people live, work, and travel. Imagine an urban oasis with hundreds of thousands of trees and whose mayor wants to plant a million more. Detailed maps of the five boroughs identify all of the city’s neighborhoods, and specific addresses pinpoint where to find a good example of each tree species.

Field Guide to the Street Trees of New York City #ad - Trees provide invaluable benefits to the big apple: they reduce the rate of respiratory disease, cool homes and sidewalks in the summer, clean the air, block the harsh winds of winter, absorb storm water runoff, increase property values, and provide habitat and food for the city’s wildlife. Bald cypress, silver linden, swamp oak, and all of New York’s most common trees are just a page turn away.

#ad